ESL Club Facilitator

West Asia, Other, 1-11 months, 12-23 months / Job ID: 1643

The international church is a typical city congregation of expats but with Korean Farsi and Turkish congregations in addition to the English one. Elder-led the church is broad evangelical and community oriented. It has existed for nearly 30 years. An English conversation club is being held at the church for locals interested in developing their English conversation skills. This church is located in a suburb where locals are accepting of the presence of foreigners and many are interested in learning English.

The English Conversation clubs are a new outreach of the church and provide a natural way for social encounters shared experience telling ones story and building friendships with locals. This short-term position is for a native English speaker interested in participating and encouraging discussion at an English conversation club. This individual should preferably have completed a TEFL course but this is not essential. The club is held two nights a week and aims to create meaningful activities to encourage conversation amongst the participants and native English speakers. The Facilitator would be responsible for planning interesting activities to engage the local participants in conversation to assist in the development of their English conversational skills. As a facilitator he/she must also be able to respond when help is needed (vocabulary grammar pronunciation etc.).

We are looking for a native speaker with a good grasp of the English language who can develop creative and engaging activities to encourage conversation. An ability to work cross-culturally with other expats and with local citizens creativity passion and flexibility are all good characteristics.

ESL Convo. Club Table Host

West Asia, Other, 1-11 months, 12-23 months / Job ID: 1602

The international church is a typical city congregation of expats but with Korean Farsi and Turkish congregations in addition to the English one. Elder-led the church is broad evangelical and community oriented. It has existed for nearly 30 years with a strong focus on refugee work strengthening the national churches and cooperation and unity among Christians.

The English Conversation clubs are a new outreach of the church and provide a natural way for social encounters shared experience telling ones story and building friendships with locals. Table Hosts engage with local participants from the community sitting on a table with a small group and modeling and encouraging them to further their conversational skills. These table hosts are guided by the ESL Club Facilitators and therefore are not expected to plan the activities. Currently the program runs 2 evenings a week.

The ideal person for this role will have a good grasp of the English language good communication skills be able to talk in a group and encourage conversation enthusiastic and positive. An ability to work cross-culturally with other expats and with local citizens creativity passion and flexibility are all key characteristics.

Counsellor

West Asia, Other, 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 561

This ministry was started by some of our partners in 2014 to address the long-term impact of childhood abuse which is rampant in the local and refugee communities. This is a non-official group including a few licensed counsellors.

There is need among the expatriate national and refugee communities for counsellors. This country has a high attrition rate among its expatriate workers and counsellors can help stem the flow. There are also enormous needs in the local community which could be addressed by a qualified counsellor. This job could be done through the local or international church or independently.

We are looking for a short-term licensed counsellor who can help with English-speaking expats and nationals or a long-term counsellor who can learn the language and get involved at a deeper level.

English speaker

West Asia, Other, 1-11 months / Job ID: 1375

Those in cross-cultural service need English to communicate well within their organization and beyond. Yet some from new sending countries have only minimal English and feel handicapped by this. They desire to improve through conversational English and daily practice but need a native speaker to come and work with them and their children.

You would work directly with these cross-cultural workers on English language skills with emphasis on speaking and listening and vocabulary building run conversational English groups personal times with each adult play learning for the children (songs games etc). It involves doing life in English each day together sharing just language but friendship and partnership in the work.

A person is needed who can embed within the team and help these workers (and their kids) practise and improve their English. Patience creativity people-awareness sensitivity to other cultures and a servant heart are all needed.

Librarian

West Asia, Other, 1-11 months / Job ID: 1554

The aims of this organization are to make the Bible available in a language people can understand and at a price they can afford. They continue to work on Bible translations for all of the people groups in this nation to have Gods word in their own language. Their translation policy ensures translation guidelines acceptable to the Catholic Protestant and Orthodox Churches.

A librarian (or library science student) with skills in cataloging is needed to set up a library system for the national organization for its many Bibles and books in multiple languages collected over the last 200 years. In the collection are many rare and first edition books of historical significance. This person should be able to design and implement a cataloging system for current and future books and set up the library.

A person with a heart for integrating their skills in library cataloging and organization with a calling to spread the Good News. A willingness to work cross-culturally with the Director who is a local citizen and believer. Creativity passion and flexibility are all good characteristics for this person.

Alternative Energy Consultant

South Asia, Other, Consultant / Job ID: 894

With huge energy shortages and rising prices many hospitals throughout the country are struggling to operate properly to provide appropriate care. These hospitals are looking for individuals able to suggest alternative energy and water supplies as well as possibly start up the projects.

Power and water shortages plague most of this country. Many hospitals struggle to provide care with irregular power supply and water shortages. An individual/team with experience in alternative energy sources and/or water purification methods is needed to help these hospitals continue to provide their valuable services to the communities in which they work.

Qualifications would include experience in alternative energy sources and/or water purification methods. A willingness to be flexible and work in tough environments is essential.

Counsellor or Psychologist

South Asia, Other, 2+ years / Job ID: 210

This organization is a co-operative inter-agency international multi-cultural ministry that provides opportunity for renewal training consultation and direct crisis response for personnel working with the mission and humanitarian aid agencies in the region.

A mental health professional for missionary care and training of locals is urgently needed We seek to appoint a psychologist or counsellor to our staff as soon as possible. S/he will be professionally qualified as a clinical or counselling psychologist or as a counsellor accredited with the professional association in their home country and experienced in working with clients from a variety of cultures.

Ideally this person would have previous experience of overseas work or would have several years of working experience in the home country plus an understanding of cross-cultural life.

We are Kingdom Gardeners

For 168 years, Interserve’s approach to ministry has been to focus on the whole person. People are at the centre of our work. But people live in a physical, social and spiritual context which shapes their whole approach to life. As people striving to see God’s will done on earth as it is in heaven, we want to be Kingdom Gardeners, nurturing the Kingdom of God in all its glory. We can’t ignore the natural environment where people live—and where we also live—as we love and serve them.

Caring for God’s creation, with its people, has always been part of the story of redemption— both physically (“The Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it” Gen 2:15) and metaphysically (“The kingdom of heaven is like a man who sowed good seed in his field” Matt 13:24). As we go into the world, caring for people requires us to engage with the whole context in which they live. We become able to say, as Paul did to the Thessalonians, that “Because we loved you so much, we were delighted to share with you not only the gospel of God but our lives as well” (1 Th 2:8). Sharing our lives gives us the opportunity to make known the glory of God in all His handiwork.

“The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands” (Ps 19:1). The knowledge of God is demonstrated to everyone through His creation. But how much of God’s incredible handiwork is obscured by the careless or wilful destruction of nature? And how often is this tied to unjust exploitation of people? For many, experiencing creation in all its intended glory is unattainable. As crosscultural workers, we can be a prophetic voice in a natural and spiritual wilderness, showing God’s intention for His creation and His people. As we demonstrate our love for God by caring for everything He created, we invite people to better understand their Creator and His desire to see all creation restored to its intended glory. “Be exalted, O God, above the heavens; let your glory be over all the earth” (Ps 57:5).

Interservers show how God loves the world— His people and His creation—in many different ways. A naturopath works with the local community to develop healthy and sustainable food sources in an arid environment. A family lives with a displaced people group, helping them farm in productive ways that value all life. Another couple runs an eco-tourism business in an area occupied by several oppressed minorities, bringing people together through enjoyment of God’s creation. An engineer’s day job is working towards providing sustainable, alternative energy. After hours, he partners with the local church to meet needs in the refugee community. A researcher is studying the practical and spiritual relationship between animals and humans, working with local people to demonstrate and share God’s love for the world. Kingdom Gardeners plant, water and tend the garden, and God brings the growth. “May the whole earth be filled with His glory” (Ps 72:19).

Peter has worked with Interserve in Australia and the Middle East for over 20 years.

Small beginnings

Nine months ago, we were looking for a house to rent in South East Asia. Our family had just moved here, hoping to be a part of the community as my husband works training teachers. I vividly remember looking out the kitchen window of one house to a big, grassy backyard (so different from others we’d seen with bare concrete). We could imagine our daughters playing there … but who would they play with? A small face peered through the fence and was soon joined by her two older sisters. Thank you, Lord!

At first grappling with the local language was all consuming, but gradually we found ourselves with more time and energy to look for ways to connect with our neighbours. This has been a priority because it’s impossible to train people well without knowing about their lives.

We also wanted to be part of the witness of God’s people here—there are many misunderstandings about what Christians believe and how they live—so that others may have the opportunity to experience peace through Jesus too.

We are learning that sometimes small, seemingly insignificant things can have a big impact … like our two small veggie patches. A friend gave us some old, open seed packets, but would they grow? Yes! From them grew tomatoes, tarragon, capsicums, bok choy, zucchini and spinach. We marvelled with our new neighbours at the variety and beauty of God’s creation.

Everything grew much faster than we expected because of the heat and humidity, and we soon had an overflow to give away. We got to know new and old friends through conversations about the garden. What should we grow next? Local friends had lots of ideas … “Corn would grow well, pumpkins too. Why don’t you pull out the old stalks?” “We wanted to wait to collect the seeds, and to enjoy the birds visiting.” “Will you make more garden plots? Why not the whole backyard?”

We had known one lady for five years but had no idea of her passion for and knowledge of gardening. She discovered the unfamiliar taste of tarragon. Would she like to take some plants? Sadly, she had nowhere to grow them at her house, but she took a big bunch of leaves. We better understood how our lives are different and the same.

Passers-by started sharing ideas about how to use our produce. Our daughter’s friends asked to help water the plants. All the while we wordlessly shared other, more precious things, such as time together—yes, we like being with them and listening to them—and the opportunity to give others a connection with the earth and an experience of God’s abundant creation.

Deeper conversations are still hard for us in our new language, but when friends do tell us about their troubles, have we sensed the same unspoken questions over and over? Does God see them? Will He care for them? Do we know anything about Him worth listening to? It has been precious to experience together the Lord’s care, very present and adding colour to our lives.

Any gardening takes time, even if it’s just two small veggie patches. As we take the time to care for nature—to nurture, to learn new methods, to preserve the ecosystems around us—this is a concrete expression of our faith. We’ve been encouraged by how God can use it to bless others and to demonstrate His abundantly good ways, for His glory.

We take God at His word that He not only cares for people but for all that He has made (Gen 1:31). The wonderful thing we’re learning is that, as we care for God’s creation, so often the people around us are nurtured too … ourselves included. Thank you, Lord.

Felicity is the mother of two small children, living with her family in South East Asia long term.

Names have been changed.

Conversations about food and faith

I remember it clearly. My simple stir-fry had opened up a genuine and open conversation with a stranger about my faith in a God who loves and cares for the amazing world He has created. We spoke for almost an hour. How did that happen?! Well, in one sense, it was simple. My friend had dropped in to visit, he noticed that I was making thoughtful choices about my meal and he asked why.

In another sense, many things had brought about the conversation I had with this man. Long before I was an exchange student living overseas, I was making intentional decisions about the way I interact with the world God has made. These included research into the ethics and environmental impact of the clothes I wore, the sustainability of the produce I ate, and the welfare of the farmers and animals providing food for my table. The choices I made in my normal life in Australia allowed me to keep making those choices in a foreign culture as best I could. I hope that my friends see integrity between my beliefs and how they play out in my daily life. My friend saw those distinctive choices and asked a question about them.

Hayley, an On Tracker in Central Asia, shares a similar experience. “Shop owners like to give you one plastic bag per item. Carrying around my own bag has reduced my plastic accumulation, and I hope as my language develops I can have conversations about why I do this.”

Despite living in very different cultural contexts, Hayley and I have something in common. We’re wrestling with how caring for creation is integral to our faith. As we live that out, we hope for the opportunity to share about the love of God with those who witness our actions. I hope that as Hayley grows in her language skills, she will have similar encouraging opportunities for conversation and friendship.

As Christians we have a unique voice to speak into this space of caring for the environment. We care because God cares.

In a bleak environmental landscape across the world, with ravaging bushfires, devastating drought and species extinction, many feel hopeless. I admit I sometimes do. It is appropriate to cry out, “How long, O Lord?” Over the years God has had to remind me that ‘saving the environment’ is not a burden He expects me to carry. In my personal grief and frustration over the ways we take the environment for granted, I’ve been able to lean on the corporate history of grief and lament we have in the Christian faith. We are equipped to respond to the eco-anxiety and ecological grief* many people experience.

We can also share a clear hope for the future. Callum, a Partner in South East Asia, writes: “Our Father has a plan not just for redemption of individuals, but for all of creation. As we live as his agents in this world, we seek to see His Kingdom come. We are longing for the day when He brings back perfect harmony and balance to our environment. But for now, we have the privilege of being part of His work and bringing glimpses of His Kingdom to the world. I love the fact that our faith gives us eternal perspective.”

It is this hope that has resulted in some of the best conversations I’ve had with others about my faith. What a beautiful, transformative message to get to speak into people’s lives.

Katherine is a Creation Care Advocate for Interserve. She has an Honours degree in Marine Conservation and Resource Sustainability, a Graduate Diploma in Divinity and loves to chat about mission and the environment!

Some names have been changed.

*Vince, Gaia. “How scientists are coping with ‘ecological grief’”. The Guardian, 13 January 2020 (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/jan/12/how-scientists-are-coping-withenvironmental-grief).