Grant Writer

South Asia / Other / 2+ years / Job ID: 1033

This organisation strives to help all nationals, women and men, achieve a fuller and more satisfying life. There are many opportunities for expatriates from different countries to contribute their professional skills.

To play a key role in advising, providing hands-on technical support to, and building capacity of one or more Cluster Teams in developing high quality competitive project grants/proposals in line with the organisation’s strategy

We welcome inquiries from expatriates interested in serving in this country with our organisation, even if their background does not fit exactly into one of the posts mentioned.

Volunteers for Asylum work

Arab World / Other / 1-11 months, 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1188

We are a group of volunteers who assist refugees with asylum / resettlement procedures. We assist refugees free of charge with filling in their forms for resettlement. We are also involved in assisting a foreign Embassy in the first stage of resettling women survivors of abduction.

We need volunteers to help us with Asylum Procedures starting with interviewing Iraqi and Syrian refugees. The information gathered is then typed into forms and submitted to the relevant Embassy or sponsors in the country of resettlement.

Anyone who can work in a team, has a compassion for refugees and is willing to do a lot of paper work. The person needs to be able to get a comprehensive story from the refugee and write up these stories for the application form.

Safety & Security Advisor

Central Asia / Other / 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1484

A faith-based NGO, working in an insecure environment, impacts communities in areas of health, economy and social empowerment.

The appointee will advise on overall safety and security management for the organisation, provide training and oversight for the local security manager, monitor and interpret the current security situation, liaise with other relevant security entities, and assist in critical incident management.

You will need experience in security management, experience living in an unstable security environment, and a collaborative attitude and good relational skills. You will need to be calm in a crisis, to be a good communicator and team player, and be willing to learn language and culture of the host country.

English Language Teacher

Central Asia / Other / 1-11 months, 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1485

A faith-based NGO, working in an insecure environment, impacts communities in areas of health, economy and social empowerment.

The job involves preparing and teaching English language lessons (written and spoken) for National Staff who need to upgrade their English skills for their job.

You need good interpersonal skills, and a minimum of a TOEFL teaching qualification or qualification in teaching. You should be a native English speaker or demonstrate excellent command of spoken and written English. You should be a good communicator, be confident and patient, and be willing to learn local language and culture.

Capacity Building Catalyst

Central Asia / Other / 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1497

A faith-based NGO, working in an insecure environment, impacts communities in areas of health, economy and social empowerment.

Our organisation is in an exciting transition period of building capacity and releasing greater responsibility into the hands of local staff. The person in this role would be responsible for assessing the needs of our staff, and facilitating the planning and provision of the necessary development.

We are looking for someone who is experienced in training, with good organisational skills and good people skills, a confident person who is a good communicator and a good networker. You should be able to see the ‘big picture’ and be willing to travel within the country. and to learn the language and culture.

Advisor for Coffee Business

South East Asia / Other / 1-11 months / Job ID: 1589

One of our partners is starting a small business for coffee trading. He is seeking help in knowing how to develop his organization into a viable business.

The job involves visiting local coffee farmers, exploring the quality of coffee, doing market research for local market for coffee; building links to export coffee; and mentoring a local worker in developing the business.

The person should have a business background and a good knowledge of and love for coffee. The person should be a man who is open minded and flexible and in for an adventure. He should be willing to come alongside the local worker and to travel regularly. The person should be outgoing and community minded and also willing to join other community development activities.

Illustrator

West Asia / Other / 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1503

A Christian publishing house and ministry for children produces books, magazines, Sunday School lessons, and camp lesson booklets for children, runs camps and teacher training programs, and has a long-term vision for developing the church by reaching and discipling the next generation in this Muslim country.

This involves developing illustrations for children in books, magazines, Sunday School materials, and camp lesson booklets that can help build the child’s knowledge of Jesus, encourage them in their faith and build community with children in other parts of the country.

Applicants must have reasonable drawing skills for illustrations, plus the creative skill to make them appealing for children. Experience in developing illustrations for children is important. A 1-year minimum commitment is required, longer is preferred. Willingness to learn some local language is required.

Refugee Worker

West Asia / Other / 1-11 months, 12-23 months, 2+ years, Consultant / Job ID: 1374

The church in this city is responding in love to the flood of refugees coming from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and Iran. Refugee ministry is a team effort, using a community center and home visits, seeking to minister wholistically to the needs of these people, in Jesus’ name.

Refugee ministry is available for those willing to come and serve. People of all nationalities and ages can help in this work. No experience or special qualifications are needed. There is a lot of people contact, so being outgoing and friendly and open to cross-cultural friendships is important. By touching, in Jesus’ name, the lives of those devastated by war or persecution, you can help them come to know Him and His healing and transformation. Volunteers can help in significant ways, whether short- or long-term, through language help, art, sports, music, drama, administration, technical support, home repair skills, visitation, listening, prayer, etc. Knowing Arabic, Farsi or Dari is a plus, but not required.

We need people with a servant heart, who can care for people. You need flexibility, a love for people, and a desire to share Christ in word and deed. The person must depend on God, and have a solid spiritual life. They need to be flexible, adapting to a dynamic work environment and changing refugee needs and profiles. We want to start new ministries to refugees, so if the person were an initiator or leader-type, that would be a plus. The person should be a team-worker, with good people skills, and be willing to learn the language and culture of the refugees they serve.

Love at work

As a Christian friend and I chatted about his week at work, he shared that two work friends were doing it tough – one diagnosed with terminal cancer and one with other serious issues. As the conversation continued my friend confided that he was considering leaving his workplace of 30+ years and going into ministry.

My response: “Why not stay at work and go into ministry?”

Most Christians spend a huge part of their waking hours at work. But how do Christians work? We love. Love is a big deal for us. In fact, God says it’s the biggest deal (Mark 12:28-31). It makes all the difference. For almost 40 years, I’ve worked in many jobs, in several different cultures. Here are nine things I’ve learned.

Love intentionally.
If I want to really love my neighbor as myself, I’d best get to know them. No matter how busy my workshop gets, I try to make time to listen to and better understand at least one bloke each day. It usually means asking a question when we are working on something together, and listening.

Love prayerfully.
Consistent, focused, informed prayer. Choose one person at your workplace and start praying for them, every day for a month. As you listen and observe, you can pray in a more informed way. To help me be consistent, I also chose a spot on the drive to work each day to start praying for the blokes at work.

Love sacrificially.
Put yourself out for the good of others. It is often the ‘smaller’ sacrifices that impact our non-Christian friends. One work mate’s adult son had an issue that I could help with, but our work schedules made it hard to meet. I simply went to meet him during a break from his work, on a Saturday. It meant heaps to him that I gave up my free time and travelled to help him.

Love by taking responsibility.
Sometimes we come across as self-righteous when we let people know we follow Jesus. A mate of mine introduced himself to his army unit like this: “You should know that I follow Jesus. That means that you can always expect me to treat you with respect and to tell you the truth. If you think I’m not living up to it, feel free to let me know.” He put himself out there as a Christian, but the responsibility was on him. Often the boys in my workshop apologise to me when they swear. I tell them that they can swear if they like – that’s their decision. I say I follow Jesus, so I should live to a different standard, not those who don’t follow him.

Love with words.
Is it enough to let our actions speak for themselves? If I love God and love my neighbor as myself, then I’ll speak about God’s love as well as living it out. One situation that comes up again and again is Monday morning. “What did you do on the weekend?” Saying “I went to church” goes down like a lead balloon in most cases.

Some responses I’ve used instead: “I heard this great joke and a ripper story.” First I told the joke, then the story: There was this bloke who had two adult sons, and the younger one said to his dad, “Give me my half of the inheritance…” Their responses included things like: “Wow, what a great dad.” There was no need to mention ‘church’ or ‘sermon’. The main thing was to help people look at the father’s character, and then let them know Jesus told the story about God, our Father.

Love in hard times.
Work is not always easy. People see us most clearly when we’re under pressure. When someone has caused a problem, what should we do? Forgiveness is a mark of love. We still need to fix the problem, but we can avoid putting people down when they do something wrong. What about when the problem is of my own making, perhaps even from my own sin? Are we willing to take responsibility, to ask forgiveness, to be humble?

Love together.
The Christian life is not a solo effort. If you work with other Christians, pray together that you’d all honour God in your work, and pray for co-workers. Make sure you don’t use work time to pray, and don’t ‘pray on the street corners’.

Love life.
Work is a big part of how God made us to live, but life is more than work. Don’t forget the rest of life – family, church, neighbours – and don’t forget to rest. How does being a workaholic show love for God and people? Resting is a real form of trusting God.

Love actually!
Run with one of these ideas this week. I pray that you will live your life for Christ, at work and everywhere.

Phil and his family lived and served in Central Asia as Interserve Partners for more than 20 years. He currently works in an Australian manufacturing workshop with a multicultural team and is a CultureConnect team member.
Names have been changed.

How ’bout them kids

We’d like you to meet Kath, Interserve Australia’s new TCK Advocate. We sat down for a chat to learn about what she’s up to!

What are TCKs?
TCKs are Third Culture Kids. There’s a first culture: that of their parents and their passport country. And there’s a second culture: that of the place they are living in. But these kids grow up in a third culture, a unique mix of the first two. So they are called Third Culture Kids.

They can thrive in a multicultural and international environment, and connect with people across barriers of religion, language, and age. TCKs acquire all sort of skills, from bartering in the marketplace to catching planes, to speaking other languages. And they see global issues like poverty or human trafficking from a very personal perspective.

What are some of their unique needs?
One of the biggest issues for TCKs is loss and grief. They may say goodbye to someone they care about every six months – sometimes unexpectedly. Some kids become reluctant to make friends, because they’re scared that friend will leave. Kids also grieve their stuff. When they first go over to a country, they might have tons of Lego but they can’t bring it with them. They lose culture too – one of my youth girls said “I don’t understand how girls and boys relate in Australia”. They even have to learn a new language – Australian teenage slang.

What’s involved in being a TCK advocate?
TCKs need to have someone willing to listen to them and to speak for them. My heart is to see that kids are socially, emotionally, physically and spiritually healthy.

Part of my role is to help equip parents and families as they prepare to take their kids overseas. I’ll be helping out with Missions Interlink’s ten-day Transition Training twice a year, specifically to help kids transition to new environments. I’m also working on resources for churches.

Another part of the role is personally supporting kids re-entering Australia. The role is being developed as we speak and will continue to evolve. I can see the way God has prepared me. I’m a trained social worker and youth worker, and growing up some of my best friends were missionary kids. My first job was as a child therapist with kids who had experienced abuse and struggled with mental health issues. More recently, Interserve sent me to a school in Cambodia for two years and through that experience I better understand the world that TCKs live in and the challenges and struggles they face.

What’s it like being a voice for these kids?
Sometimes kids are not able to share what’s on their hearts because they’re afraid of what their parents will think. So I ask, “If you can’t say this to your parents, are you willing for me to say it?” In that way I can be their voice, and help facilitate communication within the family.

Or I might be a voice for them in their church. Church families think TCKs have come back home – but home for them is the place where they’ve grown up. There are heaps of ways people can support TCKs – prayer, practical help, a listening ear. Learn more.

What’s your favourite thing about being a TCK Advocate?
Listening to the stories of our young people. I love to hear their experiences of life in other places. I think listening is one of the most important ways to building a relationship so they feel comfortable to say, “This is how really I feel”.

It’s exciting to see where God’s taking this role. It’s God’s journey and God’s dream. I would always be underprepared if it was my dream. But this is God’s idea.