Teachers and staff

South East Asia, Education, 1-11 months, 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1616

This vibrant nurturing school community has a vision to see students impact the world for Christ and exists to support missionary and Christian expatriate families working with the people of this country and surrounding regions. We nurture our students God-given gifts and abilities with programs in music and worship art and design sports technology and a range of extra-curricular activities to complement their academic studies

Current opportunities from January 2020 include a Principal Upper Primary Teacher PE Teacher Secondary Maths and Science Teacher Computer Science Teacher (ICT).Other openings from August 2020 include IT Manager Bible Teacher Primary Teacher Music Teacher Secondary/Primary PE Teacher. Drama Teacher(Part-Time or Full-Time) Computer Science(ICT) Teacher Secondary English Teacher Secondary Science Teachers (Biology and Physics) Students Wellbeing Coordinator (Counselor).

Teachers each profess the schools Statement of Christian Faith and hold professional teaching qualifications in their home country. We want to employ qualified experienced and committed teachers who love to see their students grow as Christian people. Applicants should have a personal commitment to Jesus a sense of humour and a willingness to go the extra mile.

The work of walking humbly

A friend recently commented that living cross-culturally strips back your identity to its most basic shell. My experience took me on a journey from being a competent, confident adult who was contributing to his community to a place where every aspect of my identity was challenged.

This was partly by my own choosing. Several years ago Marie Clare and I, along with our two children, departed Melbourne (one of the world’s most livable cities) for Bangkok, Thailand. We spent our first year studying Thai. We easily could have moved to Thailand to teach in English or to work in a large international church or school. However, we felt a strong desire to partner with the local church, to be involved in community and to learn to speak Thai.

We have now been in Thailand for three years. A large portion of our time has been dedicated to learning Thai, watching the people and environment around us and attempting to understand a culture that often intrigues us. We are often exhausted, frustrated and at times desire to return to a place where we are understood and are able to clearly articulate our thoughts and feelings.

Thai is a tonal language with 5 distinct tones. The meaning of a word changes based on its tone. Thus far I have yet to master these tones. I have discovered I enjoy getting out and about and speaking to people. In English I love to talk to people about politics and debate the current hot topic. However, in Thai my conversations last 5–10 minutes before I run out of things to say. In meetings I am 5–10 seconds behind the conversation. By the time I have decoded the conversation and translated my thought into Thai, the conversation has well and truly moved on. Thai people are kind and they are always amazed by how much Thai I can speak. But I know how far I have to go before I can think and speak Thai effortlessly. The more I learn, the more I know how much I don’t know.

So is learning Thai worth it? Why can’t I, like many mission workers here in Thailand, just speak English and get someone to translate for me? Then I could get down to doing what I really love: teaching and discipleship.
The answer is yes, it’s worth it! I don’t always feel this way. It is hard living in a place where you can’t express your thoughts clearly and have deep conversations. However, this journey is not about me. I have come to understand that without walking humbly with God, one cannot understand or practice justice, mercy or humility (Micah 6:8). Not being able to speak has provided me with an opportunity to observe, to slow down, to listen and to pray. Language learning has taught me to rely on others and on God.

God often reminds me that I am not walking on this journey alone, nor am I leading the way. I am walking humbly with Him. My identity is not found in my Australian passport, my Persian heritage, my science and teaching degrees. My identity is found in God my father.

Emmanuel is a qualified chemistry and biology teacher. He and his family are in Thailand long-term, partnering with the local church in outreach and discipleship.

Social work and software

OSCaR is one of those things that’s hard to write about. It’s a social work case management and database software package. It doesn’t tug at your heartstrings like rehabilitating drug users, or rescuing people from trafficking, or reuniting children with their families. It’s certainly not what I had in mind when our family left Australia for Cambodia in 2014.

In my life before Cambodia, I was a case management social worker in a high school, working directly with disengaged young people. I also had some experience supervising social work students through their university placements. Coming here, I knew that I probably wouldn’t be doing the same thing – social work in a second language is really tough – and I assumed I would fit into a support role at an NGO.

Social work is a fledgling discipline in Cambodia.The Royal University of Phnom Penh started offering the Bachelor of Social Work in 2008, and the number of qualified social workers in the country is low. While there are many Cambodians at NGOs with a lot of life experience, the lack of formal education often results in people making things up as they go. It goes without saying that social work like that often doesn’t lead to the best outcomes for vulnerable people. Unfortunately, there is also a history of some missionaries obtaining visas as social workers despite being unqualified, contributing to the perception that social work is not a real discipline. But now work is in progress to address these issues.

I now work at Children in Families (CIF), a local NGO dedicated to providing family-based care for vulnerable children. When I started here in 2015, I was asked to conduct a social work audit. We had some good practice strengths, but weaknesses in client assessment and record-keeping. Those administrative things don’t sound particularly exciting, but they have knock-on effects for the quality of social work generally. How can you make a good plan for someone if you haven’t assessed and understood their situation? How can you keep the details of 20 people fresh in your mind and provide high quality follow-up every single day, if you never adequately write down the things you’re doing with them? And how can you ever hope to report on your work to your donors (and so keep on doing that work in the future!) if you haven’t got records of what you’ve done?

I’m not a computer programmer, but I grew up comfortable with computers. And our office already did most of its work digitally, so it felt natural to look at supporting our work with better software. We applied for (and won!) a grant to develop a case management system in late 2015. The system has continued to be more and more widely adopted, but it’s tempting to ask, so what?

I’ve been really excited to see how OSCaR has contributed to the development of social work practice at CIF. Our assessment structure is now more relevant and lets us track long-term whether the work we do is improving the lives of the kids we support. We keep records in Khmer, with processes in place to let managers supervise their staff. We track all the things we need to in order to report on our work to our donors, and our managers are beginning to understand how they can be involved in monitoring and evaluation processes themselves. As I’ve helped other organisations integrate OSCaR into their practice, I’ve seen how they also wrestle more with their own work and consider how best to serve their beneficiaries.

I believe that God wants to see Christians not only reach out to the vulnerable, but reach out in ways that are helpful, relevant and competent. And while OSCaR by itself does not work with vulnerable people, it is supporting hundreds of social workers, in Cambodia and in other countries, to do so more effectively. This isn’t the work I expected to do, when I left Australia five years ago. But I’ve seen God bring things in line, and I’m grateful to have been put where I am.

Chris and his wife Stacie advocate for family-based care for children. Their family lives in Cambodia.

The gift of a voice

Speech therapy is largely unheard of in Cambodia. Currently there are no speech therapists in the country who were trained at a Cambodian university. For the last 18 months, I have worked as Program Manager in a locally-run organisation working to grow speech therapy in Cambodia. We have a vision for a Cambodian university-qualified speech therapy profession that is able to provide high quality, culturally-relevant services to the estimated 600,000 Cambodians with communication or swallowing difficulties.

Establishing a new profession is a pretty daunting task! Curriculum writing, development strategy, clinical research and advocacy work all require connections and expertise beyond our little team of seven Cambodian staff and three foreign therapists. For a university course to be relevant to this context we need to document research and experience of using speech therapy strategies here. The purpose of this is to evaluate what approaches to speech therapy work in Cambodian culture and in the Khmer language, rather than simply transplanting models of practice from Western countries.

Cambodia has a long history of foreign therapists working in isolation for a few months or years, each investing in their small area but with little connection to government systems and no overall coordination. One of the first tasks for our organisation was to partner with others to establish the Cambodian Speech Therapy Network, with an aim to share resources and learning, and to be an orientation point for future speech therapists coming into the country.

Another early task was to establish a speech therapy clinic as a social enterprise. Two years in, our private clinic is booked out and needs more staff than we can find. This clinic brings opportunities to document therapy in Cambodia. Furthermore, also critical to ongoing success, the clinic helps to raise awareness and builds advocacy platforms with influential Cambodians whose families have benefited from therapy.

Currently, many children with disabilities are not in school even though by law and by government policy children with special needs are allowed to attend. Last year we designed and implemented a pilot project to coach rural primary and preschool teachers in their inclusion of children with communication difficulties within government schools. Beginning with disability-accessible schools from the government’s special education department, our staff worked to train the teachers in skills and knowledge that assists them in using teaching methods that helps all children learn. Presenting our results to the government was a tangible example of how speech therapy could help Cambodians. We ended the year with a formal partnership agreement with the Ministry of Education and had some very pleasing discussions with the University of Health Sciences as they plan a bachelor course in speech therapy to start in 2020.

Building on our national staff’s connections in the national disability and health sector, I’ve been able to bring my experience from 12 years of living and working in Cambodian poor communities along with my grassroots involvement in community-based disability rehabilitation work and establishment of community preschools and homework clubs. As a cross-cultural worker with longer-term experience, I’ve helped our local and foreign team members to understand each other better. In addition to my professional expertise in speech therapy, I’ve also drawn on Interserve’s values of partnership, servant leadership and valuing local expertise as together we grow our organisational culture and strategy.

While it’s not part of the employment criteria, it has been a surprise and encouragement to see how many staff members in the speech therapy project share the Christian faith. For the Christians within our staff it’s been easy to see God’s hand guiding our planning and his provision of resources and partnerships. It is such a joy to together celebrate God’s blessing, lament the injustice we encounter and advocate for systems that allow access to services for the poorest and most marginalised.

Ruth lives with her family in Cambodia. She works with a local NGO working to grow a Cambodian speech therapy profession.

Teachers

South East Asia, Education, 1-11 months, 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1512

A family learning community since 1998 the school serves the servant in the north of the country by providing quality innovative affordable family-oriented Christian education in English.

Teachers needed for 2020-21: Secondary: Math Social Studies Science English Elementary teacher Computer Teacher (Gr 2-12) Special Education Teacher and Assistant Speech and Language Pathologist Substitute Teacher ESL Teacher Curriculum Coordinator.

Christian teachers

Server / Systems Specialist

South East Asia, Information Technology, 12-23 months, 2+ years, Consultant / Job ID: 1472

Our International Office provides leadership and central support services to our people placed around the world.

You will build harden tune maintain and monitor international servers responsible for keeping them running and performing well. You will look after backups security updates and more. You will help us integrate and maintain connections with third party services. You will advise other offices on local or cloud services that are secure and compliant with international policy. They may ask you to help build and run them.

You will have deep technical experience with server operating systems (we use Ubuntu) awareness of tools and techniques for integrating third party platforms like O365 GSuite and more. You may have ethernet cabling instead of blood veins (though this is not a requirement).

Educational Leader

South East Asia, Education, 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1517

A small international school is looking for educational leaders and teachers in Math English Science Technology etc. from pre-kindergarten through high school. The school has a few international students but most of the children and staff members are locals.

The main job will be in a leadership role such as assistant principal or a role in administration management marketing or development. Candidates will also be expected to develop educational systems training mentoring and creative activities. For obtaining a visa a bachelors degree is required a teaching certificate preferred and 3 years experience. Candidates need to be English speakers as teaching is done in English but they will also be expected to learn the local language in order to build good relationships with local people.

Candidates also need to be flexible reasonably independent and have a pioneer mentality.

IT Coordinator and Teacher

South East Asia, Education, 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1518

A small international school is looking for educational leaders and teachers in Math English Science Technology etc. from pre-kindergarten through high school. The school has a few international students but most of the children and staff members are locals.

The main job will be twofold: teaching IT in English as well as being the coordinator for the schools IT needs. Candidates will also be expected to develop educational systems training and mentoring. For obtaining a visa a bachelors degree is required a teaching certificate preferred and 3 years experience. Candidates need to be English speakers as teaching is done in English but they will also be expected to learn the local language in order to build good relationships with local people.

Candidates also need to be flexible reasonably independent and have a pioneer mentality.

Athletic Director

South East Asia, Education, 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1519

A small international school is looking for educational leaders and teachers in Math English Science Technology etc. from pre-kindergarten through high school. The school has a few international students but most of the children and staff members are locals.

The main responsibilities would be teaching physical education classes coaching and development of afterschool sports activities as well as responsibilities of an Athletic Director. This will be a leadership and teaching role including some administration management marketing and development. Candidates will also be expected to develop educational systems training mentoring and creative activities. For obtaining a visa a bachelors degree is required a teaching certificate preferred and 3 years experience is also preferred.

Candidates also need to be flexible reasonably independent and have a pioneer mentality. Candidates need to be English speakers as teaching is done in English but they will also be expected to learn the local language in order to build good relationships with local people.

Teacher

South East Asia, Education, 12-23 months, 2+ years / Job ID: 1520

A small international school is looking for teachers in Math English Science Technology etc. from pre-kindergarten through high school. The school has a few international students but most of the children and staff members are locals.

The main job will be teaching but candidates will also be expected to develop educational systems training mentoring and creative activities. For obtaining a visa a bachelors degree is required a teaching certificate preferred and 3 years experience preferred. Candidates need to be English speakers as teaching is done in English but they will also be expected to learn the local language in order to build good relationships with local people.

Candidates also need to be flexible reasonably independent and have a pioneer mentality.